• Good Food

    For those of you who have read my posts for a while; the posts which are now private, you will know that BBC Good Food is my go-to site for recipes, particularly cakes and bakes.  The reason is essentially two-fold: (1) they have a large range of cakes and bakes to choose from and (2) the cakes and bakes tend to work well and are very tasty indeed.  Although I have been relying on the BBC Good Food site (not to mention their magazines, which I pick up from the newsagent if I see a copy of the latest edition) for some time now, I have had a bit of a BBC Good Food baking spate over the last few months.

    It started by baking a ‘brilliant banana loaf’ (their words).  My aim was to use my dehydrator, which I bought some months back, for the first time and luck would have it that the ‘brilliant banana loaf’ required dehydrated bananas for decoration, along with a drizzle of icing.  All was going well – the cake was baked and the bananas were dehydrating in the dehydrator – when I realised that I was running out of dehydrating time before my shift at the Coln Community Stores.   Rather than adding fully dehydrated bananas to my delicious banana loaf, I had to add a ‘sun-blushed’ version, which although looked absolutely fine when I photographed my creation, resulted in rather soggy, brown decorations by day two.  The good thing was that my lack of dehydrating time did not affect the taste of the cake in any way, just its appearance on day two.   The other good thing was that most of the cake was eaten on day one, so there was not much evidence of my flacid, discoloured bananas.  Note to self, ensure that you have enough dehydrating time (preferably overnight) and make another opportunity to practice your dehydrating sometime soon – perhaps lemons or oranges next time.

    My next bake was a decadent carrot cake loaf with a cinnamon cream frosting.  This bake came around as I was working one weekend at the Coln Community Stores (I don’t normally work on a weekend) and asked my husband, Jo to do the fruit and vegetable order.  When it came to ordering the carrots, he promises me that he asked the supplier for ‘the usual’ but when the order came in on the Monday, we were greeted with a large mound of carrots, which the Stores were certainly not going to sell in any great hurry.  By about day three, and still embarrassed by Jo (and my) collective faux pas, I decided to purchase about a kg of the carrots and then work out what I could make with them.  Carrot cake seemed the most obvious thing to make with carrots but I didn’t want to make a carrot cake that I had made before.  I also wanted to try a carrot cake loaf rather than cake.  A short google later, yet again the BBC Good Food site came up trumps.  Definitely one of the best carrot cakes I have made and tried to date.  Especially lovely with the walnuts on top.  With a retweet and like from BBC Good Foods, my carrot cake was quite a popular one on Twitter.

    My next two BBC bakes were a sticky malt loaf and a bitter orange and poppy seed cake.   Not to bore you too much with the details of these two bakes, lets just summarise as follows.  The sticky malt loaf was the best malt loaf I have ever tasted, full of flavour and moist (the word that makes everyone squirm).   One of my Twitter commentators remarked: ‘@bakebybuffy@bbcgoodfood that’s just gastro porn, stop it it’s too early ;-)’.  My bake was enjoyed warm with a generous spread of slightly salted butter, accompanied by a cup of tea.  Perfect!  The bitter orange and poppy seed cake was another flavour and texture triumph.  Following a discussion with one of my neighbours earlier in the week about the merits (or lack thereof) of the bakes on offer at the Coln Community Stores, I took a piece of my bitter orange and poppy seed cake around to his to try.  The following morning he approached me at the Coln Community Stores with a great deal of enthusiasm saying that it was the best cake that he had ever tasted.   I am sure he was exaggerating, but you can’t really get a better accolade than that.

    My final two BBC Good Food bakes were a chocolate and banana loaf which I made for my in-laws, when they visited us recently and a cherry Bakewell cake.   While I will briefly mention the chocolate and banana loaf here,  I will devote a separate blog to the cherry Bakewell cake as over the last 12 months I have tried various incarnations of the cherry Bakewell, some which have been a great success while others have been less so.

    Going back to the chocolate and banana loaf briefly, I have to admit that I resorted to using bought dehydrated bananas (as I didn’t have time or didn’t make the time to dehydrate my own with all the cooking I had to do the same weekend) to decorate the loaf.  It was another delicious bake, made especially delicious by a sour cream frosting.  A posting on Twitter seemed to confirm the popularity of the cake, with 11 retweets and 55 likes and with one commentator stating that they had made the loaf for their book club ladies and they all agreed that it was delicious.

    On that note, let me end my blog post by saying that if you are ever at a loss as to what to bake, scour BBC Good Food site.  I am sure that they will have something to your taste and I am sure whatever you choose it won’t disappoint.

  • Nothing beats a warm banana and walnut muffin for breakfast

    Muffins have always been something that I have enjoyed making.  They are easier than most bakes, but still result in a delicious morsel to eat in a fraction of the time.  No mixers, blenders required, just a couple of bowls, one with your dry ingredients and one with your wet ingredients and a fork or spoon to combine the two.  The only care you need to take is when you add and mix your wet ingredients into your dry ingredients, as over-mixing at this stage of the process will result in an over-processed looking muffin with a chewy rather than light and fluffy texture.

    If you live in the UK, you will know that it has been very hot and dry (i.e. no rain, not a lack of humidity) of late (the experts are saying unprecedented), well with my reorganisation of my kitchen to make way for home baking, my fruit bowl was relegated to the top of my new storage racks in which there is a place for everything and everything is in its place. However, there is a problem with the relegated spot for my fruit bowl; it is a little too close to the overhead lights, which I turn on when I need a little more light in that part of the kitchen.   As a consequence, when I was taking down a couple of apples to have with my lunch yesterday, I discovered a few browning bananas.  Not wanting to throw them away (as they say, waste not want not), I decided that the first mission of the day today was to turn what would otherwise be food for my food waste bin into a delicious breakfast.

    After Googling banana muffins I settled on a recipe from BBC Good Foods, simply entitled ‘banana muffins’.   It had a five star rating, albeit if I am honest from only one reader.  Despite this and despite not having two of the ingredients required i.e. pecan nuts and buttermilk, I went ahead as planned.

    PS, I should mention that the BBC Good Food site is one of my go-to sites for basic recipes as 9.9 times out of 10, they yield delicious products.

    The 1st step in my banana muffin making was making my buttermilk replacement – mixing the 125 ml milk with a teaspoon of lemon and letting it sit for 20 minutes while I weighed out the rest of my ingredients.   This is a good alternative to buttermilk as sometimes buttermilk is hard to find or not something you necessarily have in your fridge.  Or put another way, you are more likely to have lemon or vinegar (vinegar works just as well) in your kitchen arsenal than buttermilk.

    I had a bag of handy walnuts, so used these instead of pecans.  Not to bore you with the rest of the process; lets just say that I followed the rest of the recipe as outlined on the BBC Good Food site until I got to portioning out my muffins.  Although the recipe suggested that it made 12 muffins, I used large tulip muffin cases and so the recipe only yielded 8 rather plump looking muffins.  Despite this, the cooking time was still around the 20 minute mark in my fan oven at 170 degrees Celsius.

    I ate my first one (yes, I ate two) warm with a cup of tea for breakfast.  Nothing beats a warm muffin just out of the oven.  However, just to check my theory, I thought I would try another one, this time cold, with a cup of coffee to recover from a shopping trip to Fairford.  Okay, shopping trip is a bit exaggerated as I merely picked up a few groceries from Londis, fresh vegetables and bread from the Fairford Market and toiletries from Boots.  Low and behold, my theory seemed to be correct.  The flavours of the muffin seemed to be more enhanced when it was warm.  I needn’t have tried that second muffin after all – while my taste buds may have liked it, I am sure my waistline or the scales won’t be liking it shortly.

    In conclusion, although a very fine muffin indeed, I feel that it could benefit from a little added spice (a pinch or two of cinnamon and/or allspice) and possibly toasting the walnuts (or pecans) before adding them to the mixture to get a nuttier flavour.   I will have to wait until I discover another batch of browned bananas on the top of my storage rack before I can put these suggestions to the test.  However, if you already have some brown bananas which need to be used up give my suggestions a go and let me know what you think.  You will find the recipe for the banana muffins (by Elena Silcock) at www.bbcgoodfood.com.  Happy baking!